Tag Archives: North Dakota Museum of Art

Call for Entries: NDMOA’s This Week Only

All Artists are invited to place one work of art in the

North Dakota Museum of Art’s upcoming exhibition

This Week Only, January 27– February 2, 2019

This Week Only is the Museum’s most popular exhibition from our region. Imagine a panoply of art from the Red River Valley and surrounding plains and woodlands; walls covered with works springing from our own place to brighten our lives in the dead of winter.
This is the third This Week Only exhibition, the only non-curated show in the Musuem’s schedule. Last year they changed the dates and closed on the day of the Annual Benefit Dinner. Remember, don’t submit works of art you entered in either of the two earlier exhibitions as the public will remember.
Last year people poured in and lingered over a hundred works on paper, paintings, sculptures, photographs, crafts, and multi-media everything. The opening brought a nice and eager crowd, raising over $72,000.  Again this year, if one wishes to buy at the opening or in advance of the Dinner, a 20% premium will be added to the sale price.
Artists:  The Museum is ready to invite you to do it again. Please submit, buy, celebrate, and expand your visual acuity, or just have fun. As noted above, they are showcasing the show during the Museum’s Annual Benefit Dinner. Your work will be the highlight of the evening and a benefit for you and the Museum. The Benefit Dinner is the region’s most glittering and festive occasion. Instead of the customary Silent Auction, the art in This Week Only will be offered for sale with proceeds split 50/50 between the artists and the Museum. Artists set their own prices.
Eligibility: If you are a serious artist from North Dakota, Southern Manitoba, neighboring Minnesota, and northern South Dakota, you are invited to submit one artwork of your choice to This Week Only.
Dates: The show officially opens at 2 pm on Sunday, January 27, 2019, and continues for one week, closing on Saturday evening, February 2.
Delivery of Art: Museum staff will be on hand January 19 – 24  to receive the art during the Museum’s regular hours: 9 – 5 weekdays and 1 – 5 on Saturday and Sunday.
If you wish to ship, the art must arrive at the Museum within the receiving time. They will return it to you in your packing materials and charge your credit card for the cost. Make these arrangements on the Entry Form.
Acceptable Artwork: Two-dimensional works of art cannot be larger than a total of 16 feet. (For example 1 x 7 feet, 2 x 6 feet, 3 x 5 feet, 4 x 4 feet or any size smaller.) If you are submitting three-dimensional or non-wall work, please give them a call to discuss special considerations.  Sculpture must fit through a regular door (7 x 3 feet). Special equipment needed for display—including sculpture stands, monitors and projectors—must be furnished by the artist. The art must be ready for installation, including proper framing to protect the art. No clips and string, or other devices that will allow the work to slip out of the hanging apparatus, become unhinged, or become damaged. This is an uninsured exhibition so artists must protect their own. The Museum can refuse works of questionable condition, and hang certain works in designated areas.
Entry Fee: $25 prior to or when the work arrives at the Museum.
People’s Choice Award: All visitors will be asked to vote.
Sale of Art: All work must be for sale and priced according to your current retail sales expectations. Remember, artists establish the sale price and split proceeds 50/50 with the Museum. Those who wish to buy before the Museum Dinner may pay an extra 20% and it’s theirs. All buyers may take the work home after the Benefit Dinner.
Return of Art: Works not sold can be picked up during regular Museum hours from February 5 – 10. Work not reclaimed or sold will not be stored at the Museum—if you saw how pressed they are for space you would understand.
This event honors Walter Hopps (1932-2005), one of America’s most beloved and creative curators, whose 1978 Thirty-Six Hours was the first such known exhibition. Francisco Alvarado, who made the jungle installation last season in the Museum’s Weeds show, had a work in Thirty Six Hours. It was purchased by Joseph Hirshhorn (the founder of the Hirshhorn Museum) who Francisco credits with kicking off his artistic career.

Job Opening for Exhibition Coordinator at NDMOA

Interested in working at an art museum?

The North Dakota Museum of Art in Grand Forks has a position opening

Job Description: Registrar/Exhibition Coordinator
Opening: August 2019
Applications accepted now with on the job training beginning summer 2019.
The North Dakota Museum of Art researches, collects, conserves and exhibits works of contemporary art. The Registrar/Exhibition Coordinator is responsible for supporting the mission, vision and philosophy of the Museum as it pertains to the above actions. The position will interpret and display objects of artistic and historical importance, with the additional responsibility of carrying out and documenting the following activities:
Object entry and acquisition of new and existing works in the collection
Management of all incoming and outgoing artworks
Care of physical objects and storage procedures
Digital photography documentation of the collection and exhibitions
Crating, packing, and coordinating the shipping of exhibition materials
Preparing objects for exhibition by matting, framing or mounting, including performing condition reports on all artwork for exhibitions and the collection
Exhibitions installation of 2 and 3-dimensional and audio/visual projects
Exhibition tour management of statewide and national traveling exhibitions
Organize and maintain off-site storage facilities
Management of insurance coverage of art collection
Interpretation and advice on legal and regulatory issues
Ability to gain proficiency in the Museum’s permanent collection database
Knowledge of best practices of contemporary display techniques (lighting, audio/video installation, hanging artwork)

Some general building upkeep and maintenance

Email your resume and cover letter to Matthew Wallace at mwallace@ndmoa.com.

McCanna House Artist-in-Residence Opportunity

Open to Artists in Music, Theatre, Literature, & Visual Arts

The North Dakota Museum of Art is accepting applications for the 2019 McCanna House Artist-in-residence season. Artists working in music, theatre, literature, or the visual arts are encouraged to apply. Open to artists in all stages of their career. Preference given to regional artists (North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, and Manitoba), with remaining availability open to all.
Image by Micah Bloom
The North Dakota Museum of Art presents a unique opportunity with the McCanna House Artist-in-residence program. This retreat consists of a 1920s farmhouse and large outlying steel building in the midst of the thriving farmland of the Red River Valley of Eastern North Dakota. While the residency affords no dedicated media specific facilities at this time, the open space of the house, barn and grounds affords opportunity for the creation of work in many scales.
Image by Kelli Nelson
 
THE PROGRAM
The residency consists of 2 – 5 week blocks of time layered throughout the operating year. The house is open from June 1 through the end of September or early October. There will only be one artist on the property at a time, unless a group project is accepted. While there are no expectations for the artist to complete work during the residency, artists are asked only to use their time wisely, and be aware of the transformative potential of time spent there.
Deadline: Applications will be accepted until January 15, 2019
2019 Announcement: February 15, 2019.
Image by Micah Bloom
AMENITIES
*Wireless Internet
*Well lit French country-style farmhouse, detached 40 x 70 foot steel building, and large outdoor space with yards and surrounding tree lines.
*House has 3 full bedrooms, each with attached bathrooms
*New washer and dryer
*New electric stove in well appointed kitchen
*Screened in porch area with convenient BBQ
*A modest array of hand tools
*Opportunities to work with surrounding community groups
*Well stocked library
*Fruit trees
*Surrounded by working fields producing soy beans, potatoes, canola, and more…
*Endless sky
*Big weather
Email Matthew Wallace with questions.

ND Museum of Art Artist in Residence Opportunity

North Dakota Museum of Art

Artist in Residence Opportunity

North Dakota Museum of Art McCanna House

 

North Dakota Museum of Modern Art Artist in ResidencyIn 2010, Margery McCanna left her 1920 French country style home to the North Dakota Museum of Art as an artist-in-residence house. This beautiful home sits on 10 acres of land 25 miles west of Grand Forks.

North Dakota Museum of Art Residency HouseIn 2014, a major storm went through (and wood peckers had their way with the cedar siding) damaging the property and taking out trees. Unfortunately, some of the trees hit portions of the house.

 

North Dakota Museum of Art Artist Residency HouseNorth Dakota Museum of Art has been working to repair the house and yard since then. Finally, the house is back in order. As they did not know when projects would be finalized, they did not fill the 2016 artist-in-residence schedule. There are openings in July and August.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is accepting residencies in writing, visual arts, and music. Due to the short notice NDMoA has waived the application fee.

http://ndmoa.com/artist-in-residence

Matthew Wallace
North Dakota Museum of Art
Deputy Director
701-777-4195

http://ndmoa.com/artist-in-residence

McCanna House Artist Residency Application

About McCanna House:

North Dakota Museum of Art presents a unique opportunity with the McCanna House Artist-in-Residence Program. This retreat consists of a 1920’s farmhouse and large outlying steel building in the midst of the thriving farmland of the Red River Valley of Eastern North Dakota. While the residency affords no dedicated media specific facilities at this time, the open mutable space of the house, barn and grounds affords opportunity for the creation of work in many scales. The powerfully vast physical space of the Great Plains allows the imagination to run wild, with the close proximity to large scale agriculture drawing one into the cycles of growth and harvest. Out of this open horizon emerges a peace and presence of mind uniquely conducive to creativity and artistic shift.

About the Artist Residency Program:

The residency consists of 3-5 week blocks of time layered throughout the operating year. Winter dictates that the house is only open from June 1st to the end of September. At this time in the evolution of the program, there will only be 1 to 3 individuals on the property at a time.  While there are no expectations for the artist to complete finished work during the residency, a pair of presentations will let the local and museum communities know what the artist is working on/through/with…. Artists are asked only to use their time wisely, and be aware of the transformative potential of time spent there.