Tag Archives: Crookston

Meet Trey Everett NWMAC’s new Showcase & Training Specialist

The NWMAC is pleased to announce that Trey Everett is our new Showcase and Training Specialist.

In addition, to coordinating all our exhibits and trainings, Trey is also a visual artist. He mostly works with pen and ink, which includes calligrams (images made with words), lectionary art, editorial cartoons, and commissions. He also enjoys indoor and outdoor mural work.

Trey grew up in the Missouri Ozarks and has lived in Crookston since 2006. He has worked in the religious world for much of his life. From 2006 to 2019 he was the Co-Director of the Minnesota Institute of Contemplation and Healing as a retreat leader and healing art instructor. Most recently, he worked in the Crookston school system as a long-term English substitute teacher.

Currently, Trey’s focus is on his spiritual direction practice, healing art workshops, graphic recordings, and his visual art career. He has volunteered and/or worked with the Queen City Art Festival, Crookston Youth Association (The Cove), Hope Coalition suicide prevention group, Crookston Library Board, UMC Art Committee, volunteer Crookston art teacher, and the Crookston High School Play and Musical Art Director.

Trey’s artistic abilities and creativity come naturally. He comes from a long line of talented artists. Nevertheless, he has studied, worked, and honed his skills over time and continues to develop them. He studies accomplished pen and ink artists, as well as world-renowned tattoo workers and muralists for inspiration, to learn techniques, and to help develop his unique style. His reading interests, meditation practices, and spirituality greatly affect his art. Listening to particular artists like Tom Petty, Josh Ritter, and Stevie Nicks, bring out the inspiration and creativity and helps transcribe the deep hidden stirrings of his heart and mind into visual images.

Trey has been called the “Tea Master” over the years. He holds the title jokingly, but he does brew jasmine tea almost daily in his little Chinese Yixing tea pot. He has developed a contemplative tea ceremony practice that he’s used with many groups over the years. The ceremony helps focus on having a welcoming attitude toward whoever and whatever life brings our way as well as being attentive to all our senses, i.e. living in the present moment.

Trey is very excited to work with the Arts Council as the Showcase and Training Specialist. “Art is so important to me and now I have the opportunity to assist and get to know artists in our region. The idea of collaborating with other artists and helping them with some of their art dreams is fantastic. Creativity is powerful! It moves us out of our anxious, neurotic minds into the deeper, calming place of our heart. I’m grateful to have this opportunity to promote and delve into creativity with others.”

Welcome to the Arts Council, Trey!

You can reach out to him with questions or ideas about our exhibits and training needs at Trey.crxpres@midcontwork.com.

Annie Fitzgerald live Stream Event March 29

Crookston Singer-Songwriter Annie Fitzgerald will be giving a live-stream concert via Facebook on Sunday, March 29th @ 4pm (for about an hour) to benefit the Crookston community. She will be splitting the donations between the New Hope Food Shelf and the Crookston School Social Work Fill-In-The-Gap-Fund.

Annie Fitzgerald: Live Stream Benefit Show for New Hope Food Shelf & Our Kiddos in Crookston

Sunday, March 29th @ 4pm – 5pm 

Facebook Live Page Link : https://www.facebook.com/AnnieFitzgeraldMusic

Facebook Event Link to invite friends: https://www.facebook.com/events/583682052223325

On Sunday, March 29th, set your phone alarm for 4 pm and join her on Facebook Live to see her play some songs and entertain us. She will have a Venmo and Paypal account set up and info on how to donate.

Ways to donate:

Venmo: @anniefitzgeraldmusic

PayPal: anniefitzgeraldmusic@gmail.com 

or  paypal.me/anniefitzgeraldmusic

— 
Annie Fitzgerald | Singer-Songwriter New Album You & Me & the Sun Visit www.anniefitzgerald.com for more information.

Photography Classes in Crookston

  • Intro to Photography: Wednesday. January 22 5:45-8:45pm
  • Intermediate Photography: Wed, February 4th 5:45-8:45pm

Location:

Sweetlight Gallery, 119 N Main St. Crookston, MN 56523

Call to register 612-269-3601
Important note is that pre-registration and pre-payment is required by phone. Simply hitting “Interested” or “Going” on the event page does not sign you up for the class.


More classes will be added based on attendance of the first 2 classes.

Roots of the Red River Valley Photography Exhibit

Stories of 1937 Sugar Beet Harvest through the lens of Photographer Russell Lee at the University of Minnesota Crookston

 Images of history, viewed through the eyes of a photographer, tell the human story. “Roots of the Red River Valley,” a pictorial history of the 1937 sugar beet harvest, will be on display at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Monday November 4 through Saturday, November 9, 2019. A gallery opening will be held on Monday, November 4 at 7 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. Daily hours for the gallery are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. each day except Wednesday, November 6 when it will close to the public at 5 p.m.

A special Thursday Commons presentation and panel discussion about the pictorial history will take place on Thursday, November 7 at noon in Kiehle Auditorium. Parking permits are not required. 

More than 80 images by photographer Russell Lee, known for his work with the Farm Security Administration, will be available in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. throughout the exhibit. All are welcome to view the historic images without charge and free parking is available in Lot G near the Kiehle Building.

The exhibit evenly distributes the photographs into three distinct categories: the migrant worker, the farmer, and the factory. Images, selected from the Library of Congress, give the viewer an opportunity for greater understanding of the lives of people and the importance of sugar processing in the Red River Valley. The photographs were all taken in Polk County, Minnesota, near Fisher and Crookston, and at the first processing plant built in 1926 and located in East Grand Forks, Minn.

“This exhibit is impressive on several fronts and definitely worth viewing.  First, the photography draws me in as a viewer, to ponder the history of farming and the immigrant worker in our area,” says Mara Hanel, executive director of the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council in Warren, Minn. “Their relationships, their families and homes.  

“The artwork tells a story and promotes dialogue around the images depicted.  Second, the size and clarity of the enlarged photographs is impressive. Third, images depicted have strong compositional elements, which speaks to the trained eye of these artistic photographers,” she continues. “I would encourage a visit either while the images are on display at UMC or talking with UMC staff about bringing this showcase to your own community for display.”   

Background 

Russell Lee, born in Illinois, attended Lehigh University in Pennsylvania graduating with a degree in chemical engineering. He left his work in chemical engineering to take up painting, which in turn, would lead to his keen interest photography. His life’s work recorded the lives of the people and places around him, documenting the ethnography of America.  

During the Great Depression in the mid-thirties, he was employed by the federally funded Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographic documentation project under the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration. He joined a team under the direction of economist, government official, and photographer, Roy Stryker that included other notables such as Dorothea Lange, Arthur Rothstein, and others. . 

With his camera, Lee traveled the United States documenting the human story of segregation, the Great Depression, WWII, life in internment camps, and much more. His work with the FSA is what brought Lee to Minnesota’s Red River Valley in 1937.

After settling in the late forties in Texas, Lee would become the first instructor of photography at the University of Texas in 1965.