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Artist Story: Tallie Habstritt ~ In the Ditch Photography

Below is a blog written by Sarah Meisinger, Owner of En Liten Svensk (A Little Swedish) Shoppe in Roseau. Thanks, Sarah for promoting artists in our region!

Life moves so quickly.

I often try and remind myself to slow down, pay attention and notice the beauty that’s all around me. It can be difficult to do sometimes and I’m guessing I’m not alone in this effort. 

Tallie Habstritt is our featured artist for February and she truly understands the value of pausing, noticing and appreciating objects in nature and in life that many of us may miss.    

Fans of Tallie’s photography appreciate the fact that her images are discovered throughout Roseau County.  I am personally drawn to the photos because her work transports me back to the images of my childhood and to a place I love.  One of my favorite images (it feels impossible to pick just one) is the photo Tallie took of the Ferris Wheel at the Roseau County Fair.  If you’re from the area or if you’ve spent some time in Roseau in mid-July, you certainly know that the County Fair is a favorite past time when family and friends gather and we enjoy the animal barns, 4-H exhibits, endless food options and of course, walking through the Mid-way. 

The Ferris Wheel photo captures these memories for me which is what I believe a talented photographer does… triggers our memories and moves us emotionally.

I asked Tallie to share her thoughts about photography, how she got started and any guidance she has to offer for new photographers just starting out. 

Please enjoy Tallie’s artist story as she tells it.  

My photographs are very simple, often single subject photographs. I attempt to showcase the beauty of common things that we are surrounded by every day that we may not take time to notice. In some of my photographs, I also try to give people the opportunity to look more closely at a subject that is fleeting in nature, such as the close-up view of the face of a butterfly or the look on the face of an owl as it studies a human being taking its picture. For me, it is an exciting moment when I review my photos and see that I have captured these types of events.
 

When I was growing up, everyone in our family took lots of pictures. Initially, we had a family camera and there wasn’t much that we didn’t take photographs of – the chickens on our farm, my Uncle Albert’s new Pontiac, an exceptionally large black and blue mark, drifts during the blizzard of 1966, our teenage friends. Anything was fair game. We just took pictures of our life and what was happening around us.

I received my first camera as a gift from my parents when I was 14 or 15 years old. It was an Instamatic camera with flashcubes. Over the years, I no longer used that camera, but I never got rid of it. I added a 35 mm camera with a couple lenses in the 80’s and later a digital camera with a fixed lens about 2001. In 2008, I bought a digital camera that accepted various lenses and then a few years later I purchased a Canon 5D Mark II that I continue to use today.

 There are a number of reasons I continue to be interested in photography. Probably one of the most important is that photography gives me the opportunity to learn new things. Even though I have spent nearly my entire life in Roseau County, before I went seeking things to photograph, I didn’t know that there were nearly pure white lady’s slippers that grew in our County. I didn’t know how exhausted a partridge looked after standing on a log drumming, or how intricate and golden frost on the window of my house became when it was back-lit by approaching car lights. I didn’t know how easy it was to get close to great grey owls and how hard it was to get near a snowy owl. I didn’t know the names of many of the wild flowers I regularly saw in the ditches. These are some of the things I have learned more about. I often don’t have a particular subject in mind when I take my camera and go for a walk or a drive, looking for something to take a picture of. I always know there is something to photograph, I just don’t know what it is until I see it. Sometimes when I photograph something, I still don’t know exactly what it is and that gives me the opportunity to learn more about something I was not familiar with.
 

 (A few of the amazing images captured by Tallie ~ single cards and card sets available at the Shoppe.)

One of my favorite photography experiences was when I was able to get pictures of a Woodcock. I had heard about Woodcocks because I had a friend who hunted them, but I had no idea what they looked like. I came across my first one, not knowing what it was, and without my camera. It was a smaller birds with short legs and long pink toes. It had a fairly short tail and a long beak with a visible tongue. It had large, dark eyes that weren’t on the front of its face, but on the sides of its head. Without my camera, I followed the bird around through the brush, trying to memorize the details so I would be able to go home and research what it was. I found out it was a Woodcock.  One writer described it as “a bird that looks like it has been created out of spare parts!” I loved that accurate description. Later I did have my camera and saw another Woodcock, the only other one I have ever seen. I was able to again follow the bird and take numerous photographs that remind me of the fun I had that day.  Because I find it fascinating to see and learn about these things, I take pictures of them in hopes that someone else might enjoy seeing and learning more about nature in Roseau County.

 (The elusive Woodcock!)


Earlier I touched on another reason I continue to photograph what I see – it relates to seeing common things, but seeing their details. It is hard to see the details of small, moving things like insects. With a photograph, you can capture the details and look more closely at them. The intricately colored wings of a butterfly might draw our attention, but how often do we get to look at the face of a butterfly? A photograph makes that possible and a butterfly’s face is also very interesting. One time I was photographing what people call a Hummingbird Moth. There are various kinds in our area and the one I was photographing was a White-lined Sphinx Moth. This moth is active in the daytime and moves its wings very fast like a hummingbird. Because it moves so quickly, it is difficult to see the pattern on the wings. With a photograph, you can catch the wings open and see how beautiful they actually are. Trying to capture these details is a challenge for me but that is also what makes photography fun. If you fail in your first or second or third attempt to photograph something, that just makes the final success that much more appreciated.
 

I also enjoy photographing people. I try to show something about the person or their personality when I take their picture and if I can do that I feel like I have been successful. I am not very skillful in taking more formal group pictures of people but I like taking candid photos. I had the opportunity to take pictures at a large family gathering and I took many pictures of various groups within the family. When I went home though and looked through my pictures, my favorite one was of the hands of the father in the family. He had been a hard working man all of his life and his hands showed it. I felt like that said something that was important to remember and that is why I liked that photograph so much.


One of the more challenging facets of outdoor photography is knowing what to wear when I go out with my camera! Ha! Because I like to walk through woods and in ditches to take many of my photographs, I have to deal with what is outside, and that often involves bugs of some sort. Mosquitoes are always around us in Minnesota and bull flies can also be bothersome. I try to wear knee-high waterproof boots most of the time, even if I don’t think I am going to be in a wet place. I think it gives the Woodticks one less place to attach themselves to me. With taller boots, I might deter a few Woodticks, but I often still end up with wet feet because I want to take just one more step to get closer to something I am photographing. That sometimes means I end up in water that is too deep.
 

I also try to wear a light weight jacket or long-sleeve shirt even in the summer. That also helps with bugs, but the main reason is to avoid poison ivy. I have not been careful enough though and typically I get one nasty case of that each year, usually when I am photographing Lady’s Slippers. I typically try not to disturb animals or birds that I see when I am photographing. I try not to get too close or I stay away all together if there is a baby of any kind involved. If I think I won’t do any harm by taking one quick photo that just involves point, shoot, get out of there I might do that, but otherwise I try to stay out of what I think of as the the personal space of birds or animals. One time when I was photographing an especially perfect clump of white Lady’s Slippers I must have been too close to a blackbird with a nest or a baby. I was making my third round trip of about 90 miles in just a few days to try get a picture of the flowers when they were at the peak of their bloom and I had finally gotten there at the right time. Every time I would lower my head, a blackbird would dive bomb me twice in quick succession and then fly to a pole to sit and look at me. The bird flew close enough to me that I did not trust him not to actually hit me. I had a hard time focusing on the blossoms and watching the bird at the same time. It took a long time to get my photographs that day. I never saw what was making him so protective. That, however, is the only negative incident I have had with any wildlife.
 

Timing plays a big part in many photographs and the photographer often doesn’t dictate the time to take a photograph. If you want a foggy morning picture, you go when it is foggy, not when it is convenient with your schedule. If you want a picture of new snowfall, you might have to go out on a very cold day even though it is hard to keep your hands warm and use your camera at the same time. Nature is constantly changing and it determines when the time is right and what there will be to photograph. That makes it challenging but also memorable when you get a picture that you enjoy looking back at.
 

For me photography has been a very enjoyable hobby and it has allowed me to learn and see new things. I hope to be able to continue my hobby for years to come.

For Tallie’s story, I decided to get in touch with someone very close to her.  I asked Tallie’s sister Sheila for additional insight about Tallie’s willingness to literally get ‘in the ditch‘ when she sees something she wants to photograph. Sheila shares,

“One thing I’d say about Tallie is that she can drive down a road at 60 mph and spot a flower or critter in the ditch and will slam on the brakes, put her boots on and make the effort to get the best possible photo of that beautiful bit of wildlife. She spots birds that blend in with their surroundings, flowers so tiny you can hardly see them, animals trying to hide from humans, and other lovely scenes with unusual lighting, clouds, or weathered buildings. It certainly helps to have good equipment, but that doesn’t help if you don’t have an eye for your subject matter.” 

In our digital age, I do hope we find time to slow our pace, enjoy the beauty around us and perhaps write a note to a loved one just because. 

Thank you Tallie, for reminding us of the importance of this through your images.

~Sarah

p.s. Discover a beautiful selection of Tallie’s greetings cards, coasters and more with images found throughout Roseau County at the En Liten Svensk (A Little Swedish) Shoppe ~ 101 Main Avenue North in downtown Roseau!

Support NWMAC on Give to the Max Day Nov 15

Once again, we are raising money though Give to the Max Day. GiveMN links donors with organizations that are working to make Minnesota a better place. Its online giving website, GiveMN.org, enables charitable giving any time and any place, allowing people to donate with ease and enthusiasm. GiveMN brings innovation, energy and fresh ideas to Minnesota generosity.

GiveMN is an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Visit GiveMN.org today to support the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council.

CALL FOR ARTISTS: Art Opportunity Request for Qualifications

Water Themed Sculptures & Mural

Public Art Opportunity

in Grand Rapids

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The Arts and Culture Commission received a Downtown Business Corridor Grant from the MN Department of Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation to develop a highly visible and creative project that generates excitement, encourages citizen engagement, and engenders visible improvements. The Arts and Culture Commission’s projects will consist of three sculptures and one mural. The Commission would like to use this public art initiative to acknowledge and honor either:

  •  the significant relationship that historical and contemporary Ojibwe and/or Dakota people have with this area, OR
  • the local flora, fauna, and natural elements that are important to the region’s ecosystem and communities

The Mural Project

One artist/artist team will be commissioned to create one mural in downtown Grand Rapids.

The Grand Rapids Arts and Culture Commission is facilitating the design and creation of a mural to be located in downtown Grand Rapids. The budget for the mural is $20,000. This do-not-exceed amount must include all fees, materials, transportation, installation, storage, permits, and insurance. More information about the site will be made available to the selected artist[s].

Eligibility

  • Applicants must be experienced visual artists or artist-led teams residing in the state of Minnesota, with special preference given to artists from Northern MN.
  • Applicant must provide evidence of producing at least two commissioned public art projects of a similar scale and budget within the past ten years.

The Sculpture Project

This Request for Qualifications is for the three water-themed sculptures. Water plays a critical role in the community’s quality of life—from the Mississippi River, to the many lakes in the region, water is central to the City’s natural beauty and recreational opportunities, as well as to public health and safety. In addition, it is important to honor the significance that water has had for the region’s diverse communities and, in particular, critical for Ojibwe and Dakota people, who understand that “water is life.” Knowing what a watershed is, where our water comes from and goes to, and how we can each play a role in preserving its function and value is important, but rarely understood.

This public art initiative will raise awareness of both the many water resources available to Grand Rapids, and the everyday actions citizens and businesses can take to improve water quality.

One artist will be commissioned to create three sculptures which will be sited throughout the City.

The budget for all three sculptures is $30,000. The selected artist/team can determine the budget for each artwork, as long as the total for all expenses does not exceed this amount (must include all fees, materials, transportation, installation, storage, permits, and insurance). More information about the sites will be made available to the selected artist[s].

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Please submit all RFQ materials via email to: tpagel@ci.grand-rapids.mn.us. All materials must be received by 4 p.m., CST, Monday, November 26, 2018. No RFQs will be accepted after this time. If you need clarification or further information, contact Tom Pagel, City Administrator at: tpagel@ci.grand- rapids.mn.us or 218.326.7626

Please visit https://www.cityofgrandrapidsmn.com/9-articles/847-arts-and-culture-commission-looking-for-artists for more information about both projects.

Handcrafted Bags Created by Area Artist Bonnie Hagen

Bonnie Hagen is an artist at En Liten Svensk Shoppe with a flair for color, design and detail

Bonnie’s Story:

“I grew up admiring my godmother who could sew anything without a pattern!  She inspired me at an early age to use my imagination and create beautiful things to wear as well as different accessories.

When I retired, I decided I needed something to keep me busy and started creating purses, weekend bags, traveling bags and water bottle bags.  I have approximately 16 different varieties of bags that I love to make.  My greatest pleasure is picking out the fabric and designing a special bag with that print or design in mind.  If I’m having a bad day, a quick trip to the fabric shop to just admire and feel the fabric sets me right back into feeling good about the day. “

You can read more about Bonnie and the bags here.

You can find Bonnie’s bags at En Liten Svensk Shoppe, 101 Main Avenue North, Roseau. You can  reach her at (218) 242-0894 or bonniehagen48@gmail.com.