Category Archives: Uncategorized

En Liten Svensk Shoppe Grand Opening in Roseau

En Liten Svensk Shoppe Grand Opening Celebration

Featuring Local Artisans

101 Main Avenue North
Roseau, Minnesota 56751
(320) 309-6108
www.alittleswedishshoppe.com

En Liten Svensk (A Little Swedish) Shoppe is a destination retail store, offering unique Scandinavian gifts, home goods and decor. They’re a business that believes in cultivating community through sharing and celebrating our beloved heritage and traditions. Stop in to see the wares of local artists.

 

Kiln for Sale

Used Kiln for Sale

Evenheat Studio Pro 24 Glass Kiln
Rampmaster RM3 Controller
Quiet Drive Solid State Relay Style
240V
Perfect for home or business.
Excellent condition with very few hours.

Price new: $2,167.00 Asking: $1,850.00

The Pro 24 means it is a 24″.  It easily holds a 20″ shelf. It is a 240 Volt so will not run on regular home wiring. Venting may be necessary depending on the size of the location in which it is housed. It is a dual access. It opens from the top and also from the bottom making access to the bottom shelf very convenient. The manual contains complete firing schedules and suggestions.

For more information contact Gloria Steinhauer at 218-386-3168 or northernborders@hotmail.com.

Area Student Art Hanging at Senator’s Office

Art created by area students is hanging at State Senator Mark Johnson’s office in St. Paul.

Pictured L to R: State Senator Mark Johnson, Sue Gens of the Minnesota State Arts Board and Legislative Assistant Rachel Bakke. The art was created by student artists Kristy Williamson of Gatzke, Amy Follette of Crookston, Elise Monson of Grygla and Spencer Wittman of Warren.

The art includes:

“The Tower” Black and White Print by Kristy Williamson who lives in Gatzke and attends Greenbush/Middle River School District.  Kristy created this linoleum print when she was in 8th grade and now she is a Senior. It is a limited edition.  All the letters in the words needed to be carved in mirror image for the print to be legible.  She received 2nd place in our art show this year for this print.  Here is her artist statement about the piece, “This piece is particularly close to my heart.  The most difficult part of this task was planning out all the words backwards. Linoleum printing is one of my most favorite mediums because how difficult it can be. I like a good challenge.”

“We All Fit Together” Painting of flag by Amy Follette who lives in Crookston and attends Crookston School District.  This painting was created as she pondered the meaning of the flag amongst protests this year and her desire to serve in the military in the next few years.  Here is her statement about the piece, “When I decided to create this piece when the controversy on whether or not to stand for the flag was big in the news. I also have recently fallen in love with cubism. So I thought that making a cubism painting of the American flag would be a great representation of our country. We are all different and have all different pieces of ourselves, but when we all come together we all fit with each other, we make each other whole. I tried to demonstrate this in my painting.”

“A String of Planets” Colorful print by Elise Monson who lives in Grygla and attends Grygla School District.  Students love to create art that shows something that captivates them and prompts their learning and in her case exploration.  Statement, “My intention was to just try and create the vision I had in my head.  I knew I wanted to have lots of shades and different textures.” 

“In Sight” Photograph by Spencer Wittman who lives in Warren and attends Warren/Alvarado/Oslo School District.  Passing time by being creative with photography.  Statement,  “This photograph explores my quiet patience, in my hunting stand, waiting and hoping for a deer.  There is pride and tradition around hunting within my family.  The aspect, that most of the time, nothing is in the scope … but at any point a deer might come into view, is what I hoped to capture.”  This piece was in the NW Art Exhibit last year.

 

Artists of Northwest Minnesota Booklet is Available

The Northwest Minnesota Arts Council is pleased to announce that the 4th edition of our Artists of Northwest Minnesota booklet is available for retail locations and others who are interested. This is a marketing booklet that will be distributed throughout our region.

The booklet includes information about a variety of creative people and artists, including visual artists, dancers, bands, musicians, performing artists, and theater directors, editors, writers and fine crafters. The booklet helps those who are listed reach out to the general public and is a means to help the public “get in touch with them” to purchase art, book them, or have them provide a service.

Arts organizations, dance studios, stores with local art, local suppliers of supplies and materials for artists, coffee shops that have open mic or live bands often, etc. are included in the back of the booklet.

Please let us know if you would like copies to distribute or for yourself. To view the booklet online click here.

director@nwartscouncil.org or 218-745-9111.

 

Want to stand up for the arts? Contact Congress Today

Contact Congress Now to Oppose Tax Bill Threats to Nonprofits and Artists

Today a wide, diverse set of Minnesota’s nonprofit organizations aligned with one voice to oppose the harmful federal tax bill. Minnesota’s nonprofit community, a sector that employs nearly 12 percent of Minnesota’s workforce and partners with millions, is asking you to take action to oppose the bill. It is expected that Congress will take action on this bill by Christmas, so please take action now.

You can take action any of three ways:
1. CALL your Member of Congress and talk about the brief, highlighted issues listed below, and/or
2. CUT AND PASTE the letter below to your member of Congress, and/or
3. Use Americans for the Arts action page to SEND A PRE-WRITTEN LETTER:

https://www.votervoice.net/ARTSUSA/campaigns

To call or cut and paste the letter below to your member of Congress:

—–MCA’s Letter——

Dear Member of Congress:

Minnesota Citizens for the Arts (MCA) and our 1600 affiliated nonprofit arts and culture organizationsare concerned about the impact of proposed changes in the federal tax law currently under consideration in Congress. These include changes in charitable giving laws and the fundamental change in the relationship between partisan politics and the traditionally non-partisan nonprofit organizations who are focused on their missions of serving the public through providing services, educational opportunities, and access to the arts. These changes are inappropriate for the nonprofit sector and will hurt access to the arts and other nonprofit services for all Minnesotans.

Specifically, we oppose reducing tax incentives for charitable giving that undermine the strength of the nonprofit sector. We support allowing more, not fewer people who can itemize their deductions. The proposal to reduce the number of people who can take deductions will have an overall effect of reducing charitable giving by $13 billion annually. The loss of that revenue will devastate the nonprofit sector by removing resources that enable us to accomplish our community-focused missions. The push to devalue charitable deductions is being made without consideration about how it will affect our work or how it will affect people who support nonprofits with their charitable giving.

We also oppose undermining the guarantee of nonprofit nonpartisanship. The House version of this bill will radically change the longstanding, vital protection in law for the nonpartisanship of charitable, religious and philanthropic organizations. These changes would allow political operatives to pressure those organizations to endorse or oppose candidates for public office and make anonymous political donations tax deductible when funneled through 501c(3)s, thus turning mission-driving nonprofits who are serving their communities into conduits for dark political money that can’t be traced. This fundamental change in the nature of nonprofits was not asked for by the nonprofit sector, nor was the nonprofit sector consulted on the impact of such a fundamental change.

Third, we oppose the Robert’s Amendment which strikes low-income artist housing from the list of qualified groups who can benefit from federally subsidized low-income housing. It would forbid developers from using housing credits to build affordable housing with a preference for low income artists. Moreover, as written, the law would also render all existing artists’ housing developments built with housing credits retroactively ineligible for the benefit. The amendment includes a simple line-for-line language swap. Where current law carves out a special exception for individuals “who are involved in artistic or literary activities,” the new bill would instead specify a benefit for those “who are veterans of the Armed Forces.” While we are also supportive of housing for veterans, we believe both should be included, not one swapped for another. Elimination of this tax credit for low income artists will have a significant impact on the ability of cities to protect their cultural community.

We ask that as Congress considers changes to the nation’s tax laws, that they:

  1. Strengthen the nonprofit sector by maintaining existing incentives for charitable giving and expanding the charitable deduction to all taxpayers, not just those who itemize, and
  2. Protect the long tradition of nonpartisanship in 501c(3) nonprofit organizations by preserving the Johnson Amendment, and
  3. Preserve the artist preference clause for low income housing incentives and add the new Veterans preference language added to it, making it a stronger and more inclusive piece of legislation.

We believe that with legislation that reflects these values, we can work together to build thriving communities on a strong foundation of service and access to the arts for all. If these changes can’t be made, we ask that our members of Congress vote against the bill.