Category Archives: Event News

Workshop for Tending our Performing Arts Gardens Event in Walker on October 19th

Minnesota Theater Alliance’s One-day, capacity-building workshop and conversations for organizations and individuals in Minnesota’s performing arts community.

Performing arts organizations — including the artists, administrators, board members, and volunteers — must be tended in order to thrive, build capacity, and take care of the holistic well-being of the people involved. Please join the Minnesota Theater Alliance and a dynamic group of presenters for useful workshops and conversations around the themes of establishing strong roots for capacity building and positive community impact. (Hence the catchy garden metaphor…!) 

October 19, 2019 — 9:00am – 5:00pm
Walker Bay Theater, Walker

  • A Statewide View of our Performing Arts
  • Celebrating Inclusive Arts 
  • Program Evaluation 101: Crafting a Plan to Get Data You Can Actually Use
  • Stage and Production Management: Building your Craft 
  • Building Ensemble and Individual Agency
  • Performing Arts Administration: Wearing all the Hats
  • Open Space ConversationsYou bring the topics! What does your community need to discuss right now?

For more information, including schedule and presenter info, click here

This event is open to any performing arts practitioner in any part of Minnesota. We have structured five events in central locations across the state to be as conveniently located for you as possible. It is great to connect with new performing arts practitioners in your vicinity, especially when you can access such a range of capacity-building content in just one day.

Register here.

NWMAC Art Exhibit at NCTC in Thief River Falls

In Recognition of Domestic Violence Month 

Northwest Minnesota Arts Council Gallery at NCTC in Thief River Falls

October 1- November 30

Artist Reception is Thursday, November 7 from 6-8 PM

Works featured by area artists Christine Foster and Stephanie Olson

The Northwest Minnesota Arts Council (NWMAC) is pleased to announce an exhibition of painted portraits, stories and mixed media by Christine Foster and a jingle dress-inspired sculpture by Stephanie Olson. The art installation, Hope & Freedom: Survivors and Thrivers of Abuse, is now open through November 30 at the NWMAC Gallery at Northland College and Technical School in Thief River Falls.

“I had a vision to paint the stories of women who are survivors of mental, sexual, physical and/or spiritual abuse. I want to help victims who are in abuse situations currently or have been abused in the past to know that they are not alone, as well as to know that there is hope. I have incorporated both images and words in each woman’s portrait story. The story will share the pain along with the healing journey.”

Hope and Freedom: Survivors and Thrivers of Abuse

Christine Foster is an artist and teacher from Thief River Falls, MN. She received a $5,000 Artist Project Grant from NWMAC to create art in 2016 for her showcase, Hope & Freedom: Mending the Soul, which features paintings of women who have previously been abused and have since found help and redemption. The exhibit also features each woman’s story next to her painted portrait.

Work by Christine Foster

“Each woman has shared their life story with me through written form or conversation. They decided what imagery, symbols, colors and words will best speak of their life. Women did or did not want part of her portrait included. I left it up to each woman’s discretion as to how she would like her story portrayed. Each portrait story is a cooperative effort between the woman, the artwork and myself.

I envisioned using a variety of windows to display the portrait stories.  Windows are a symbol of the access to our souls.  The degree of openness will depend upon each woman and their healing journey.”

Works by Christine Foster

Thief River Falls Artist Stephanie Olson will display her jingle cone dress-inspired sculpture in this exhibit.

“The idea for this sculpture came to me in a dream. I am usually a painter, so it was unusual. But I decided to try, to see what could work.”

Stephanie Olson’s Jingle Cone-Inspired Sculpture

Influenced by traditional indigenous skirts, this sculpture was made of jingle cone beads, metal wire, hand-dyed cotton twine, leather lacing, feathers, and red paint to raise awareness and support for missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. Each jingle cone bead was sponsored, meaning each bead represents an effort toward the cause of supporting funds and increased awareness for missing and murdered Indigenous women. Each jingle cone bead also bears a name, either the name of the sponsor or a name they chose in honor or memory. This sculpture was able to raise over $500 for the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center.

Jingle cones used for Stephanie Olson’s sculpture

“I am hopeful that this sculpture will continue to raise awareness for MMIW. It can also serve as a symbol for unity, for community intention.”

A disproportionate number of Native American women and girls are missing or murdered each year. This national epidemic has started to receive more attention. In Minnesota, the state recently launched a Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women’s Task Force to study the issue and make recommendations to address the problem. You can learn more about this issue at this powerful exhibit.

Meet Christine and Stephanie at the Artist Reception on Thursday, November 7 from 6 to 8 PM.

The NWMAC Gallery is located at Northland Community and Technical College in Thief River Falls. The gallery hours are Monday-Friday from 8:30-5 PM and at other times when events are held at the college. Enter through Door B. Visitor parking is free in front of the business office.

For more information about our exhibits look to our website at www.NWArtsCouncil.org, or if you are an artist interested in exhibiting a body of work with NWMAC, please contact Kelsey at (218) 688-1256 or email NWArtsCouncil@gmail.com.  This exhibit is made possible with funding from The McKnight Foundation in Minneapolis and the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment in Minnesota to the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council.  Please sign up for our e-newsletter on our website home page to see the latest news and grant announcements.  Email director@NWArtsCouncil.org or call 218-745-9111 to reach our office during regular business hours. 

Roots of the Red River Valley Photography Exhibit

Stories of 1937 Sugar Beet Harvest through the lens of Photographer Russell Lee at the University of Minnesota Crookston

 Images of history, viewed through the eyes of a photographer, tell the human story. “Roots of the Red River Valley,” a pictorial history of the 1937 sugar beet harvest, will be on display at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Monday November 4 through Saturday, November 9, 2019. A gallery opening will be held on Monday, November 4 at 7 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. Daily hours for the gallery are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. each day except Wednesday, November 6 when it will close to the public at 5 p.m.

A special Thursday Commons presentation and panel discussion about the pictorial history will take place on Thursday, November 7 at noon in Kiehle Auditorium. Parking permits are not required. 

More than 80 images by photographer Russell Lee, known for his work with the Farm Security Administration, will be available in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. throughout the exhibit. All are welcome to view the historic images without charge and free parking is available in Lot G near the Kiehle Building.

The exhibit evenly distributes the photographs into three distinct categories: the migrant worker, the farmer, and the factory. Images, selected from the Library of Congress, give the viewer an opportunity for greater understanding of the lives of people and the importance of sugar processing in the Red River Valley. The photographs were all taken in Polk County, Minnesota, near Fisher and Crookston, and at the first processing plant built in 1926 and located in East Grand Forks, Minn.

“This exhibit is impressive on several fronts and definitely worth viewing.  First, the photography draws me in as a viewer, to ponder the history of farming and the immigrant worker in our area,” says Mara Hanel, executive director of the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council in Warren, Minn. “Their relationships, their families and homes.  

“The artwork tells a story and promotes dialogue around the images depicted.  Second, the size and clarity of the enlarged photographs is impressive. Third, images depicted have strong compositional elements, which speaks to the trained eye of these artistic photographers,” she continues. “I would encourage a visit either while the images are on display at UMC or talking with UMC staff about bringing this showcase to your own community for display.”   

Background 

Russell Lee, born in Illinois, attended Lehigh University in Pennsylvania graduating with a degree in chemical engineering. He left his work in chemical engineering to take up painting, which in turn, would lead to his keen interest photography. His life’s work recorded the lives of the people and places around him, documenting the ethnography of America.  

During the Great Depression in the mid-thirties, he was employed by the federally funded Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographic documentation project under the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration. He joined a team under the direction of economist, government official, and photographer, Roy Stryker that included other notables such as Dorothea Lange, Arthur Rothstein, and others. . 

With his camera, Lee traveled the United States documenting the human story of segregation, the Great Depression, WWII, life in internment camps, and much more. His work with the FSA is what brought Lee to Minnesota’s Red River Valley in 1937.

After settling in the late forties in Texas, Lee would become the first instructor of photography at the University of Texas in 1965. 

North Country Fiddle & Dance Community Dance!

Saturday, October 12, 2019 from 7:30 to 10:00 pm

Music by Tag Team Musicians from around the region

Teaching and calling: Jeanne O’Neil and regional guest callers

East Grand Forks Senior Center, 538 Rhinehart drive S.E., EGF 

Reels, simple squares, circles, and more. All dances taught, no experience needed. 

All are welcome; singles, couples, families. 

Free-will Donations at the door. For more info contact Jeanne O’Neil at oneil@rrv.net or ( 218) 773- 3850. See northcountrydance.org

Pottery by Lisa Mathieson in Sorenson Gallery

SORENSON GALLERY IN FOSSTON FEATURES POTTERY BY LISA MATHIESON THROUGH OCTOBER

The Sorenson Gallery, located within the Fosston Library and Arts Center, is currently displaying the gorgeous pottery, beautiful glass jewelry, and vivid wildlife drawings by artist, Lisa Mathieson.  The display will be up through the month of October and can be viewed during regular library hours.  To learn more about Lisa, you can visit her website at www.lisacmathieson.com.

Lisa Mathieson Pottery Exhibited at the Sorenson Gallery, located within the Fosston Library and Arts Center

Lisa’s Bio and Artist Statement

I was fortunate to have been born into a family that valued the arts. As a young adult, I received a classical training in music. With this, came the rigorous demands for daily practice, and the fierce, utterly consuming need for self control during performances; I credit these qualities for having fine tuned me, they tempered me into the artist that I’ve become.

In my 20s, I traded my horn for a paintbrush. I received a degree in Fine Arts from Bethel University in 1988. In the following years I studied studio lighting—darkroom techniques at MCAD. I took graduate courses in poetry at the University of Minnesota.